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20120925
20121003
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. the government can't and should not shoulder theç entire challenge ofçç responseç, recovery, and prepared this. prior to theirç administration, nobody would really say that out loud. we became an agency trying to be everything to everybody at the worst possible time for all of us. it is their leadership and tenacity to hone in one this one psychological culture shift in speaking about earthquakes that is a real seismic shift in the way we look at things. we are honored to have him here for a few minutes today. the deputy administrator. [applause] ç>> good morning. it is truly a pleasure to be back here in san francisco. i was here a few months ago for the anniversary of theç loma pr ieto earthquake. in talking to a lot of folks and listening to the mayor, the mayor getsç it. i come from the city in the çnortheast. i spent a little bit of time in boston. i had a career before i came to fema to 0.5 years ago. boston and san francisco are similar in many ways. you have a mayor that is passionate about emergency management. you have a group of people in emergency managementç not o
and government. >> you grew up in the boston area. what made you want to make the transition and moved to san francisco? what motivated you to get involved in politics question marks before i ran for office, and worked in san francisco as a criminal prosecutor and civil rights attorney. i got to understand how much of a be in san francisco is to the rest of the world for social justice. i spent a number of years helping to grow a small business. i got to understand the innovative spirit in san francisco. at night, i volunteered as a neighborhood leader and as feature of an affordable housing organization. i learned so much about the challenges facing our neighborhoods and the special jewels that are the urban villages we live in. i ran for office because i wanted to serve the city and protect all that is so special about san francisco. >> what lessons did you learn after campaigning for supervisor? >> san franciscans are incredibly interested in their city government, local politics, and making sure that we remain the most amazing city in the world. i learned that san franciscans during campa
. narrator: because original infrastructure investments were frequently subsidized by the federal government, water pricing was often calculated without accounting for the initial cost to build the systems. we made major investments in assets in the '50s, '60s, and '70s. and for the first 40 years of that pipe, there really may not have been many maintenance requirements. we're past that period now. narrator: water pricing based only on day-to-day operation, and not on planning for maintenance and eventual upgrades has resulted in a considerable repair and replacement backlog. allbee: on a national scale, if you looked at what we're spending now, and you looked at the additional investment requirements over the next 20 years, there's a $540 billion difference. man: so one of the greatest challenges is to reflect true value pricing. so that the citizens and businesses that rely on water and wastewater infrastructure systems are actually paying for it. narrator: cities and municipalities across the united states are now facing this funding gap, between projected revenue and projected expenses,
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3

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